Leeds Riot Map 1643 – 2002

From varied causes and peoples including Chartists to Suffragettes in many places including Holbeck to Chapeltown the City of Leeds has seen many riots over the years. I created two things – a static map of some Leeds Riots for a print publication (RIOT!) in conjunction with Leeds based Fictions Of Every Kind. And an interactive map website LeedsRiotMap.co.uk

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Made for James (Jimmy) Cauty’s ADP Riot Tour visit to The Chemic Tavern, Leeds, 14-21 July 2016, the Leeds Riot Map shows 23 riots from 1643 to 2002.

 

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http://leedsriotmap.co.uk/  was made using the JQuery + Leaflet StoryMap plugin. As you scroll through the riots in chronological order, the map zooms and pans to the location of the riot. The basemap is Stamen’s black and white OSM basemap. Locations are approximate (interestingly, it was the more modern riots which were harder to place) and the details and reporting isnt guaranteed to be accurate either!

Should you spot errors or omissions with the site, please contact me or add an issue on github.

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Archiving old warper.geothings.net geodata and images

The first map warper application lived on http://warper.geothings.net and for a long while it used to run in parallel to the New! Improved! and much faster warper at mapwarper.net

Here’s 27K control points that people added around the world on warper.geothings.net  (There’s over 107K GCPs on mapwarper.net – maybe I’ll do another map for that)

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I’ve turned off the Rails application and have archived:

  • 5,100 maps metadata in CSV format
  • 27,409 Ground Control Points in CSV format
  • All the clipping masks in GML
  • All the maps source images converted to TIFF format
  • All the maps georectified images in TIFF and PNG formats

Simply pop over to http://warper.geothings.net if you want to check them out.

Mapwarper featured in A Digital Humanities Primer for English Students

Jenna Herdman has written an excellent free e-book about Digital Humanities for English Students which has an entire chapter titled: Digital Mapping Tool Tutorial which features the Mapwarper. It’s been published using gitbook and is available in pdf, html, epub formats.

The tutorial covers adding a map to mapwarper.net to chart the movements of David in Charles Dickens’s David Copperfield.

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The map is then loaded into Palladio which is a new tool for me. it “is a web-based platform for the visualization of complex, multi-dimensional data”.

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Do check out this great resource. The book has seven chapters in total and all of them are interesting and worthwhile to read! https://www.gitbook.com/book/jennaherdman/a-digital-humanities-primer-for-english-students/details

Colliding The Mental Maps of Edinburgh with Mapwarper.net

Last autumn I popped up to Edinburgh from the North of England for State of the Map Scotland conference. Together with Edinburgh College of Art in Evolution House participants took part in series of workshops “Map.Makars”

I took part in a memory map of the city. The rules were: no looking at other maps, the map should include the venue, the castle, the train station. We drew, from memory the city on large pieces of paper. Gregory scanned/photographed these and put these on mapwarper.net to stretch them to fit. he then combined these together with an interactive and animated transparency control to create the Hand Drawn Map Collider “No-map Map Give it a whirl! http://www.livingwithdragons.com/maps/nomap-map/

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My map, in case you were wondering was possibly the least accurate of them, coming from furthest away! http://mapwarper.net/maps/10907

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A “Frightful Number!” – Mapping Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year

Two wonderful historical maps using Mapwarper.net by Vimala C. Pasupathi @Exhaust_Fumes showing Melville in Rome and in London during the Great Plaque

http://hofstra.github.io/itinerary/

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“A Frightful Number!” Mapping Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year

“A Frightful Number” uses data culled from Daniel Defoe’s “creative non-fiction” Journal of the Plague Year and from historical sources to track the spread of the 1665 London plague. Created with Hofstra DRC’s innovative mapping tool Itinerary, the site annotates the epidemic’s progress month by month, parish by parish.

As a supplement to the novel, “‘A Frightful Number’” represents and engages with Defoe’s epidemiological mapping of the plague as it makes its way across London and its suburbs, enabling readers to gain a sense of the geography of London to which Defoe refers and a better grasp of the plague’s progression through and impact on the city. “‘A Frightful Number’” also seeks to dissect and analyze the relationship between the novel as a literary form and cartography and how their respective histories intersect throughout the early modern period. Presenting A Journal of the Plague Year in cartographic form helps underscore for readers the difficulties and obstacles that the narrator, H.F., faces as he attempts to “map” and, ultimately, survive the plague, an invisible and elusive entity whose presence is only manifest in its gruesome effects on London’s population. H.F.’s map of the plague is, in this sense, a useful and necessary technology that can make the invisible visible, giving the disease a shape and form in order to better understand its origins and causes, as well as its potential consequences for London and the nation. That said, such a task proves to be immensely difficult, if not impossible, for Defoe’s narrator, who survives the plague but doesn’t seem to come much closer to grasping it in all of its deadly complexity. “‘A Frightful Number’” thus seeks to reflect this sense of ambivalence in Defoe’s novel: to offer a map of the Great Plague that, at the same time, exposes the very real problems and limitations in fully realizing such a project.

Melville in Rome

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Wikimaps on Maps Mania: Maps in the Age of Cholera (Leeds) & The Vintage Maps of Berlin

Cross posted from The Wikimaps Blog wikimaps.wikimedia.fi

The wonderful, prolific and very popular Maps Mania blog  featured the Wikimaps Warper a few times recently, do check them out!

The first interactive map: The Vintage Maps of Berlin uses the Wikimaps Warper.

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Keir writes:

This collection of old historical maps of Berlin centers around what is now Museum Island in Berlin.

In the oldest maps you can clearly see the two towns of Cölln and Altberlin, on opposite banks of the River Spree. As you progress through the maps you can see how this area of Berlin’s has changed and developed over the centuries.

Do check out the 11 maps of Berlin from 1652 to today  here: http://homepage.ntlworld.com/keir.clarke/leaflet/berlin.htm

The second post, and interactive map entitled Maps in the Age of Cholera based on an epidemiological map of Leeds (co-incidentally my home!).

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This was also created by Keir and he writes:

Twenty Years before John Snow famously mapped the locations of cholera victims in Broad Street, London, Robert Baker plotted the deaths of cholera victims in Leeds.

Maps in the Age of Cholera is a story map based around Robert Baker’s ‘Sanitary Map of the Town of Leeds’ exploring the 1832 cholera epidemic in the Yorkshire town. Baker never made the link between cholera and contaminated water. However, in his map and in the accompanying report to the Leeds Board of Health, Baker noted that “the disease was worst in those parts of the town where there is often an entire want of sewage, drainage and paving”.

The map itself uses this Leaflet Story Map plug-in. The Leaflet Story Map library uses jQuery to create a scroll driven story map. The map tiles scheme for Robert Baker’s 1832 ‘Sanitary Map of the Town of Leeds’ comes from Wikimaps Warper.

do go check out the interactive story map here http://homepage.ntlworld.com/keir.clarke/leaflet/cholera.htm